• Electric Vehicles,  Engineering,  Motorcycling

    H-D Connect on a LiveWire, Part 3

    Parts 1 and 2 of this short series are available here and here. Featured photo: Dinner ride! First time riding in a group, much less eating dinner with other riders since the pandemic began. So, with a ride under her belt, let’s see what we can see in the H-D iPhone app. I’ve embedded a gallery below with screenshots. Overall it works ok, once you get used to counting to about 12 for updates to complete (it really needs an indicator that it is retrieving updates.) It shows my bike’s battery status and range and notifies me when it is fully charged. These are the most important things and they…

  • Electric Vehicles,  Engineering,  Motorcycling

    H-D Connect on a LiveWire, Part 2

    Activated! OK, so here’s what happened since Part 1. I took it to my dealer, Emerald City Harley in Lynnwood, Washington and repeated what the H-D support engineer said – that the TCU and cellular needed to be activated on the bike – five minutes later and that was done and I was able to get past the “There appears to be a problem…” screen on the activation website. In the parking lot I now saw (on my iPhone using Safari – and that turns out to be a problem too – stay tuned): I tapped on Yes, This is My Bike and got to step 2 of 3 –…

  • Electric Vehicles,  Engineering,  Motorcycling

    H-D Connect on a LiveWire, Part 1

    I’m in the process of setting up H-D Connect on my new LiveWire. It’s a cool service that uses a cellular connection directly to the motorcycle to retrieve motorcycle status (like how much longer until the battery is charged), tamper alerts (like it the motorcycle is being jostled) and service-needed notifications. The service was available on a wide variety of bikes, both gas powered and LiveWires, but Harley ended it for all but LiveWires. Not all dealerships are aware that the service is still very much alive and supported for LiveWires. I went to sign up, but the sign-up website wouldn’t accept my VIN: I called Customer Service this morning…

  • Electric Vehicles,  Engineering,  Motorcycling

    LiveWire: So Many Things to Try

    This is going to keep me busy for a while, and that’s wonderfully OK – even exciting. I wanted to take the bike further and faster today and I also wanted to try out a fast charger. The club is doing a ride from Lynnwood, Washington to Leavenworth, Washington – a 110+ mile trip with a 4100′ mountain pass in-between – which means my new LiveWire might make it, but might not, so I wanted to see how the bike managed its battery with highway speeds. I ran the bike in Road mode the entire time. Next time I might try Eco. I made it from Bothell to Sultan with…

  • Engineering,  Motorcycling

    I Got a LiveWire!

    It’s a dream come true! I picked up “Elvira” last weekend at Emerald City Harley. She’s a brand new black Harley Davidson LiveWire and a thrill to ride. So quiet, so fast, so responsive. With elements from all my beloved bikes of the past, from the Honda Nighthawk, to the Yamaha Midnight Warrior, to the Harley Street Bob. The best of each of them in an electric superbike. This bike perfectly matches my personality, and it scratches itches that only EV enthusiasts, Electrical Engineers and Mobile Embedded Device Developers have! I’ll be posting plenty on this bike and our adventures. Zoom zoom! PS: I’ve updated my previous post on the…

  • Engineering

    IoT CV Project Demo

    The Internet of Things + Computer Vision = “Remote Roller” I’ll post more about this shortly. For now, enjoy this demo video. You can find all the code on GitHub.

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  • Engineering

    Un-Expected Value and a Slow Snake

    I just finished the latest course towards my Masters in Electrical Engineering at UW – Probability and Random Processes for Electrical Engineering. And yeah, I got an A (>100%). And I’m glad I took it even though I had, years and years ago, taken Stochastics at Johns Hopkins. Although core concepts like probabilities, random variables and the like haven’t changed, the options available to engineers for numerical methods seem more practical now. Our final project involved using a Naïve Bayes Classifier to classify handwritten digits from the large MNIST database ( http://yann.lecun.com/exdb/mnist/ ). First you train your classifier against 60,000 training images (handwritten digits from 0 to 9) and then…

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  • Engineering,  Leadership

    Back in the Engineering Saddle Again

    A little over two years ago, fresh off the heels of helping ready my company’s part of the Internet for the GDPR, I offered to again take up the leadership of a small team I had led before – this time to launch another SaaS offering – this time in payments. The opportunity aligned well with my personal goal of leveling up my leadership skills with what was then an eye on a director of engineering role, and it also aligned with a engineering roadmap I had set forth nearly five years ago to get hardware related work (specifically integrating our software with mobile payments and point of sale hardware)…

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  • Engineering,  Hardware

    Z Nope

    I was excited to start setting up the Z-Wave bridge. That excitement has dimmed. I’m got the device in the mail, whipped out the installation instructions, plugged it into my Pi and… The first step was to run a curl command to a http site and pipe it to sudo bash. Eeek. I mean I know people joke that the “S” in IoT is for “Security” but this wasn’t funny. I’d never ever do such a thing on a device and trust that device again. I proceeded against my better judgement to see how far the rabbit hole went. (I’ve since disconnected the Pi from the Ethernet and will reflash…

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  • Engineering,  Hardware,  RF

    A Photogenic Z-Wave Bridge

    We’re moving away from Z-Wave tech and investing more deeply in Apple HomeKit. Part of that will include using a Raspberry Pi to act as a Z-Wave bridge until we (eventually) replace the Z-Wave devices with devices supported by HomeKit natively. And because it would be boring just to plugin in a headless Raspberry Pi, I decided to have it do double duty as a digital picture frame using a neat little touchscreen by EVICIV. This article covered most of the setup needed to use feh and xscreensaver, although I did need to do one tweak, probably because I am running a relatively new version of Raspbian (Raspbian GNU/Linux 10…

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